Close Corporate Tax Loopholes Updates

How Much Did You Pay for Tax Dodging Corporations?

By | Phineas Baxandall
Senior Analyst for Tax & Budget Policy

Yesterday, millions of Americans rushed to the post office to file their federal income tax returns. For all of us, the checks we wrote were an average of $434 higher because of the burden we are forced to shoulder for major corporations and wealthy individuals who use offshore tax havens to avoid paying their share.

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Tax

Tax Shell Game: How Much Did Offshore Tax Havens Cost You In 2010?

Tax havens are countries with minimal or no taxes, to which U.S.-based multinational firms or individuals transfer their earnings to avoid paying taxes in the United States. Users of tax havens benefit from access to America’s markets, workforce, infrastructure and security, but pay little or nothing for it—violating the basic fairness of the tax system.

News Release | U.S. PIRG | Tax

Washington, D.C.: Off-Shore Tax Havens Cost U.S. Taxpayers $434 a Year

Major corporations and some individuals avoid as much as $100 billion a year in federal taxes by “off-shoring” the profits they make here in the U.S. or by setting up sham headquarters in tax haven countries.

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Tax

Tax Shell Game 2010

Many corporations operating in the United States funnel money through offshore tax havens in order to avoid paying billions in U.S. taxes. Taxpaying households must pick up the tab for the missing revenue to the U.S. Treasury. Making up for this lost revenue costs each taxpayer an average of $500 per year.

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Tax

Tax Shell Game 2009

Many of the largest corporations in our country hide profits made in the United States in offshore shell companies and sham headquarters in order to avoid paying billions in federal taxes. The result is massive losses in revenue for the U.S. Treasury – which ultimately must be made up by taxpayers. 

Report | CALPIRG Education Fund | Tax

Sunshine for California

Corporate tax avoidance leaves taxpaying households to pick up the tab for funding highways, schools, and other public structures. Much of the indirect costs of aggressive tax avoidance are also borne by investors who are unaware of these risky schemes. And everybody suffers when corporate profitability is determined by opportunities for tax evasion rather than efficiency or innovation.

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