Label GMO Foods

IN THE DARK — While the U.S. is one of only two industrialized countries without mandatory GMO labeling, some major grocery stores, like Whole Foods, have committed to label foods containing genetically modified ingredients. But labeling GMO foods shouldn’t be the exception—it should be the law.

The Right To Know What We’re Eating

We passed a federal law requiring manufacturers to list ingredients and other nutrition information on food packaging. We now use this information to make responsible food choices. More than 60 countries, including the entire European Union, already require GMO labeling, but in the U.S., consumers are still denied this basic information.

Concerns About GMOs

Most of the food available on store shelves contains genetically modified ingredients—and it’s not without risk. Crops that are genetically modified are designed for increased pesticides and herbicides, which have been linked to serious health impacts.

We Can Beat Big Ag

Monsanto and other giant agribusinesses are spending millions to oppose labeling efforts—Big Ag spent close to $40 million against a labeling initiative in California last year. But we can overcome Big Ag: More than 96 percent of the public polled supports labeling GMOs. With people increasingly concerned about food choices and taking charge of their health, now’s the time to pass a federal law that will establish GMO labeling in the U.S.

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